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Inside this Issue: Country French

From the Editors of Country French

While many decorating styles ebb and flow, country French—and its legions of fans—has remained a stalwart of the design landscape for centuries. It’s no surprise when you consider what this style represents: tranquility, comfort, a connection to history, and a home that isn’t just decorated but lovingly curated.


Photo: Nathan Scroder / Produced by: Donna Talley / Accessories: Curated by Kristin Mullen

Each featured house in this issue is filled with antiques and salvaged materials that carry with them stories of treasure hunts both near and far. For Pamela Harrington, her love affair with country French style began at the back of a small antiques store in Beaune, France, when she came across a delicately carved buffet and knew she couldn’t possibly leave without it. Thirty years later, her dreamy château on Kiawah Island, South Carolina, is flush with similar finds, sourced mostly in the South of France, which layer each room—indoors and out—with history and patina (“The Journey Home,” page 44).


Photo: Brie Williams


Photo: Brie Williams

Interior designer Kim Scodro has also traversed the globe in search of special pieces for her clients. For her own Scottsdale, Arizona, home, her goal was simple: To create warmth and balance with a mix of classic French elements, like arched interior doorways and wood-trussed ceilings, and fresh, neutral furnishings that complement the desert location and her family’s entertaining-friendly lifestyle. It’s a soulful, serene escape that epitomizes no-fuss elegance (“Living in the Moment,” page 34).


Photo: ​Laura Moss


Photo: ​Laura Moss

In Texas, interior designer Meg Lonergan created a medley of her own, pairing contemporary furniture with traditional French architecture in a new home that offers surprises at every turn (“Modern Revolution,” page 60). This talented designer’s take is refreshing and unexpected, yet that familiar feeling—of comfort, tranquility, and a sense of history—still remains. It’s proof that our favorite design style, though unquestionably timeless, is also infinitely versatile. 


Photo: Julie Soefer


Photo: Julie Soefer

Welcome to Country French.

The Editors

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