You are here

Meet the 2019 New Trad Designers

Get to know our new class of rising-star designers

Produced by Sally Finder Weepie
  • Marc Touissant

    Brittany Bromley

    Which “traditional” design rule(s) do you swear by?

    I love good, classic symmetry!

     

    Which design rule(s) do you break?

    I love the look of high-glass paint – even when the woodwork or the wall underneath is not in perfect condition, I love to see the brushstrokes and the interesting permutations that the gloss brings out in the surfact texture.

     

    Do you have favorite “traditional” design elements (A classic furniture design, pattern, style, etc.?)

    English roll-arm sofas are always in style in my book!

     

    Which iconic interior designer(s) do you admire, and feel are still relevant today? Furniture and/or product designer(s)?

    Michael Taylor, Sister Parish to name a few . . . Furniture: George Smith and De Gournay are two classic favorites.

     

    What design eras inspire you?

    I love the late '60s – a real Talitha Getty moment.

     

    Which antiques or vintage designs do you think have held up over time and play well with today’s updated traditional interiors?

    I love French Bombe chests, gilt mirrors of either Gustavian or French extraction, and Maison Jansen brass tables.

     

    Tell us how your work is inspired by travel and other cultures.

    We love to travel and do so often for work; however, we are inspired in our day-to-day lives by almost everything we see. Recently we were in Morocco, where the inlaid furniture, atlas region handmade rugs, and hammered silver are currently playing prominently in our design schemes.

     

    How do you keep your traditional interiors fresh and current?

    We like to mix hand-blocked fabrics and natural-fiber rugs like Abaca or jute with our antiques to give them a fresh, modern, and collected feel.

     

    Give us a couple of examples of modern and traditional design elements that work well together. (For example, chinoiserie paired with a Parsons table or Converse worn with Prada suit.)

    Lately I’m loving antique French bergeres paired with a modern burled wood table, layered on top of a jute rug – flanked by two antique ebonized French chests.

     

    What is a classic color combination that still feels fresh?

    Pale blue and melon.

     

    Do you have a favorite go-to palette at the moment?

    Each of our projects are so different that I’m quite sure we would have a revolt on our hands if I started reusing the same palette! Personally, I love to mix bottle green, saffron yellow, and coral as accent colors into quieter color palettes as a jolt of interest.

     

    How would you define today’s “new traditional” design?

    I think there is a whole generation of people who have grown up with classic architecture and traditional design elements, and new traditional design allows them to incorporate those classical elements into their more modern lifestyles. We still may use a traditional French bergene – but we’re covering it in a performance boucle wool for durability and wet bathing suits!

     

    How would you describe your personal design style?

    My personal style is very similar to my design ethos – classical with a dash of modernity. I like a mix of old and new as well – pieces with age re-covered in fabrics that are hand-blocked or hand-painted – always a mix of black and natural-fiber rugs. In my own home I can be more adventurous – I just redid my kitchen and painted it high-gloss black with dramatic cream and pink marble slabs and a tortoiseshell hand-painted antique table!

  • Daniel Soberlano

    Ryan Saghian

    Which “traditional” design rule(s) do you swear by?

    Formal floor plans. I love defining rooms vs. open floor plans, which are such a trend now, especially in Los Angeles.

     

    Which design rule(s) do you break?

    All of them. I don’t believe in rules when it comes to creative expression.

     

    Do you have favorite “traditional” design elements (A classic furniture design, pattern, style, etc.?)

    I love a good cabriole leg and chinoiserie motifs. Nothing beats a good De Gournay or Gracie panel!

     

    Which iconic interior designer(s) do you admire, and feel are still relevant today? Furniture and/or product designer(s)?  

    Dorothy Draper and Tony Duquette. I love high style.

     

    What design eras inspire you? Mid Century Modern, Hollywood Regency, and French Regency.

     

    Which antiques or vintage designs do you think have held up over time and play well with today’s updated traditional interiors?

    The classic acrylic and brass combination. Love the vintage days of Charles Hollis Jones, and I find that they play so well with today’s traditional spaces.

     

    Tell us how your work is inspired by travel and other cultures.

    I am greatly inspired by my own Iranian culture. The rich patterns and colors of the architecture in the Middle East. My other greatest inspiration is Paris. Every corner I turn, I find something that inspires me!

     

    How do you keep your traditional interiors fresh and current?

    Juxtaposing more contemporary pieces and art to not only elevate the look but complement the traditional approach.

     

    Give us a couple of examples of modern and traditional design elements that work well together. (For example, chinoiserie paired with a Parsons table or Converse worn with Prada suit.)

    A contemporary mantel with straight edges and simplistic shapes paired with an 18th-century Regency clock on top. That’s a clash that screams FABULOUS!

     

    What is a classic color combination that still feels fresh?

    Black & White. Always. Forever.

     

    Do you have a favorite go-to palette at the moment?

    Right now, taupe and burnished brass.

     

    How would you define today’s “new traditional” design?

    Quality interiors with meaning behind every piece.

     

    How would you describe your personal design style?

    California modernism meets Old Hollywood glamour.

  • Simon Brown

    Beata Heuman

    Which “traditional” design rule(s) do you swear by?

    • Curtains always have to pool a couple of inches onto the floor.
    • Wherever there is a seat, always have a side table within reach so you have somewhere to put down your drink.
    • Lighting a sitting room is about making people look good – this is better achieved by low-level lighting such as lamps, and always make lamps dimmable.

     

    Which design rule(s) do you break?

    Other than ensuring comfort, which is key, we try to turn things on their head a little. There will be unexpected meetings of high and low and definitely a lot of mixing of styles going on.

     

    Do you have favorite “traditional” design elements (A classic furniture design, pattern, style, etc.?)

    I’m obsessed with the designs of Le Manach (by Pierre Frey), I basically love every pattern and especially their chintzes.

     

    Which iconic interior designer(s) do you admire, and feel are still relevant today? Furniture and/or product designer(s)?

    I am influenced by many designers of the past, but my biggest design crush is definitely Josef Frank. The brightness and clean lines, the variation and sense of humor, and beyond all the fact that all his designs have stood the test of time is just brilliant. I often reflect on why that is, and this is a huge source of inspiration and even guidance to me.

     

    What design eras inspire you?

    Again; we are all about mixing it up, but I suppose we mostly look at the first half of the 20th century, Art Dec,o and even Arts and Crafts from time to time.

     

    Which antiques or vintage designs do you think have held up over time and play well with today’s updated traditional interiors?

    If something is well-thought-through and well-designed, it normally stands the test of time and has a place in today’s rooms. One thing that I personally go back to a lot is painted Swedish 19th-, and if we are lucky, 18th-century furniture. I am also amazed by some early 19th-century and 18th- century fabric patterns I have come across; they are often completely wild and so intricate they really are works of art.

     

    Tell us how your work is inspired by travel and other cultures.

    All our projects are the results of myriad inspirations coming together. In truth I never traveled much growing up, and I don’t travel a huge amount now because I have two little ones, but also because I always found a way of exploring the fantasy of the exotic while staying put. It’s kind of funny—many of our rooms look like the inhabitant has gone on a Grand Tour and returned with treasures from all over the world.

     

    How do you keep your traditional interiors fresh and current?

    At the heart of our designs is the need for function and comfort, which means being modern in that sense and constantly thinking of how this can be improved upon. We tend to use relatively simple materials but treat them in a creative way—a half-round huge Carrara kitchen backsplash; an MDF fridge cupboard shaved like an old-fashioned cabinet. We take inspiration from the past but make something new with it.

     

    Give us a couple of examples of modern and traditional design elements that work well together. (For example, Chinoiserie paired with a Parsons table or Converse worn with Prada suit.)

    A Gubi pendant over a Rococo center table; Eames desk chair by a Swedish Neoclassical desk; IKEA glasses in a Plain English kitchen.

     

    What is a classic color combination that still feels fresh?

    Pillar box red with white always works!

     

    Do you have a favorite go-to palette at the moment?

    I seem to return to an overall pale soft yellow or ivory backdrop with green-blue accents.

     

    How would you define today’s “new traditional” design?

    To me it’s all about contrast and unexpected meetings. We have a wealth of knowledge that comes from everything that’s been, and when you combine that with modern sensibilities you can create something really exciting!

     

    How would you describe your personal design style?

    In the course of a lifetime, one gathers a multitude of views, experiences, and objects. The home should make it possible to take in all of these things. We look at the past as well as the present for inspiration to create layered and balanced designs that stand the test of time. It’s playful, considered, and irreverent.

  • Diana Elizabeth

    Erik Peterson

    Which “traditional” design rule(s) do you swear by?

    Le Corbusier’s Modulor man is segmented according the “golden section.” These proportions can be scaled up or down to infinity using a Fibonacci progression. In devising this system, Corbusier was joining a 2,000-year-old hunt for the mathematical architecture of the universe, a search that had obsessed Pythagoras, Vitruvius, and Leonardo Da Vinci.

     

    Which design rule(s) do you break?

    “Form follows function,” coined by architect Louis Sullivan, was broken by Frank Lloyd Wright in that “form and function are one.” I agree in that I don’t think that this iconic architect’s rule should be two separate elements, but as FLW revealed, they should be considered at the same time as the same element to solve the design problem.

     

    Do you have favorite “traditional” design elements (A classic furniture design, pattern, style, etc.)?

    The traditional elements of design I use most would be symmetry, axis, rhythym, balance, unity.

     

    Which iconic interior designer(s) do you admire, and feel are still relevant today? Furniture and/or product designer(s)?

    Ralph Lauren is famous for reinterpreting the past by evoking grander times with his richly layered look. The opulent Lauren style has inspired a generation of decorators to embrace tradition that gets scaled up for American homes and proportions.

     

    What design eras inspire you?

    Renaissance, Modernist, and Postmodernism are my three eras of inspiration. All three eras relate to carefully proportioned buildings, new ways of thinking about design, and an emphasis on the form of function.

     

    Which antiques or vintage designs do you think have held up over time and play well with today’s updated traditional interiors?

    Incorporating special iconic designs from the past inspire and ignite today’s interiors. A Murano glass chandelier, Mies Barcelona chair, or classic Persian rug carefully placed in a room can bring a whole room together . . . past and present.

     

    Tell us how your work is inspired by travel and other cultures.

    I think design is about experiences. Experience of space, light, sound, touch, etc. You can’t get that from a photo. Therefore, it’s crucial to get out from behind your desk and see life inhabiting space to learn how humans relate to environments. This is the only way to learn how to create new inspiring spaces.

     

    How do you keep your traditional interiors fresh and current?

    I don’t work toward “fresh and current” because that sounds too much like “trendy.” Anything current today doesn’t work by the time the home is complete. I work toward “timeless,” and that takes more effort than being trendy. It involves having the knowledge of history and materials and confidence in knowing how they work together.

     

    Give us a couple of examples of modern and traditional design elements that work well together. (For example, Chinoiserie paired with a Parsons table or Converse worn with Prada suit.)

    Imagine a room with large floor-to-ceiling steel-putty-glazed windows, whitewashed French oak wide-plank wood floor, antique reclaimed hand-hewn beams on the ceiling, white plaster walls with modern large-scale artwork, bold-color modern area rug on the floor, and a modern leather furniture seating arrangement. I can’t think of anything better!

     

    What is a classic color combination that still feels fresh?

    Black and white; whether it’s a checkered floor tile, artwork, a rug, or floor and walls — you can’t go wrong.

     

    Do you have a favorite go-to palette at the moment?

    The Farrow & Ball color palette offers unique, unparalleled depth of color and a capacity for subtle, handsome transformation under different light conditions.

     

    How would you define today’s “new traditional” design? Today’s new traditional, or better known as Transitional, is a blend of old and new that meets our current lifestyle challenges, but also brings the comfort and style of something familiar and human.

     

    How would you describe your personal design style?

    My personal design style reflects my client’s lifestyle, the site, and the integration of human scale and natural light. It inspires a sense of surprise and delight. My design style is all about experience and function.

  • Max Burkhaltar

    Margaret Naeve

     

    Which “traditional” design rule(s) do you swear by?

    I’m a firm believer in the mix. For me, there has to be a combination of different elements: mixing periods, eras, colors, textures. I don’t think there is a formula, but I find it inspiring to mix contemporary art with vintage finds.

     

    Which design rule(s) do you break?

    You don’t have to have color in a room to make it interesting. It can also be about texture and contrast.

     

    Do you have favorite “traditional” design elements (A classic furniture design, pattern, style, etc.)?

    My favorite traditional design period is early XXC Scandinavian and French furniture. The form is so unique, and they have a pure feeling that can relate to either an antique or a contemporary piece. They are also identifiable in a classic way.

     

    Which iconic interior designer(s) do you admire, and feel are still relevant today? Furniture and/or product designer(s)?

    Axel Vervoordt, Jean Roger – Axel is a master of layering the old and new, the texture and form. It’s timeless yet contemporary, and that’s why it’s still relevant.

     

    What design eras inspire you?

    I love XVIII C Swedish design. It’s very clean and classic and can mix with modern design. I am also very inspired by current designs. Brands and designers like Apparatus, Pierre Augustin Rose, Pinch, and Egg Collective are doing great work, which in my opinion will be the new collectibles.

     

    Tell us how your work is inspired by travel and other cultures.

    Since I own a furniture store, I have the opportunity to travel for the shop and be inspired by all the great design I see. European design seems to be one step ahead of what’s happening here in the U.S., so I’m thrilled each time I have the chance to bring new ideas back to the States. This is the case not only for furniture, but textiles, color, techniques, etc.

     

    How do you keep your traditional interiors fresh and current?

    The best way to keep them fresh is by layering contemporary art, accessories, and lighting with vintage and antique pieces to give it a new spin.

     

    Give us a couple of examples of modern and traditional design elements that work well together. (For example, chinoiserie paired with a Parsons table or Converse worn with Prada suit.)

    You can put an Egg Collective Dinesen dining chair with a white Mandriotti 1960s dining table, or personally, wearing Golden Goose tennis shoes with a Dior dress.

     

    What is a classic color combination that still feels fresh?

    Lately I have been obsessed with the combination of blush and green. We’ve seen it in modern and traditional interiors alike, and it’s something that I’m incorporating into my own home.

     

    Do you have a favorite go-to palette at the moment?

    I do love blush and green, but lately I’m really liking deep navy blues and acid greens mixed together. The contrast, yet brightness works. If you add some off-white, it balances it all out.

     

    How would you define today’s “new traditional” design?

    It’s all about layering, not about just one period. I also think that nowadays everything is all about color and pattern, which is not necessarily my thing, but it can be visually inspiring. It’s all about finding a way to incorporate it into your own personal aesthetic.

     

    How would you describe your personal design style?

    Uncommon luxuries. It’s something I believe in. I like the idea of contradictions in my work, believing that you can play with scale and pattern to create an experience that goes beyond color.

  • Tara Hope Photography

    Laura Hodges

     

    Which “traditional” design rule(s) do you swear by?

    I always carefully consider proportion and scale when I’m designing a space. Traditional design has a beautiful sense of balance and symmetry, so understanding how these design elements work together is part of my design process.

     

    Which design rule(s) do you break?

    Small rooms can feel more spacious when painted a light color, but I love creating jewel boxes by painting a small space a darker color. Mixing metal finishes can also be a challenge, but it can add a layer of sophistication if it’s done well.

     

    Do you have favorite “traditional” design elements (A classic furniture design, pattern, style, etc.)?

    I love the classic Italian Savonarola chair as well as the Greek key pattern and the Greek Klismos chair. These timeless designs always play well with contemporary furniture styles and even a more modern aesthetic.

     

    Which iconic interior designer(s) do you admire, and feel are still relevant today? Furniture and/or product designer(s)?

    I love Dorothy Draper for her high-contrast, eclectic style that still feels modern today. I find that Charlotte Perriand’s sculptural furniture is also a great addition to many contemporary spaces.

     

    What design eras inspire you?

    I’m always inspired by Art Deco because it often pairs well with traditional design styles as well as more minimal, contemporary spaces. I also love the dramatic silhouettes and lush fabrics of that time period.

     

    Which antiques or vintage designs do you think have held up over time and play well with today’s updated traditional interiors?

    Bentwood chairs, from the captain’s chair to the bistro stool, have a timeless appeal with a tailored, unfussy style that feels fresh in a modern interior.

     

    Tell us how your work is inspired by travel and other cultures.

    Traveling to new countries is the best way for me to find new and unique design inspiration. Whether it’s local art, fabrics, furniture, or architecture, exploring a different culture opens my mind to new ways of approaching design.

     

    How do you keep your traditional interiors fresh and current?

    I love scouring vintage and antique furniture sites to use classic pieces in a new way. I’m also always developing new design ideas in our studio and through collaborations with local furniture makers. Traditional silhouettes and shapes in new materials and finishes are important considerations in my design process.

     

    Give us a couple of examples of modern and traditional design elements that work well together. (For example, chinoiserie paired with a Parsons table or Converse worn with Prada suit.)

    I love the mix of modern art paired with a more ornate and traditional frame. Throw pillows in soft, vintage textiles can look perfectly at home on a modern, tailored sofa.

     

    What is a classic color combination that still feels fresh?

    My favorite color combination has always been black and white, which never really goes out of style. I also love navy blue and camel, which, if you vary the shades of each color, can be very layered and sophisticated.

     

    Do you have a favorite go-to palette at the moment?

    Right now, I love deep blues paired with a dusty rose. It’s a beautiful combination that can be moody and romantic or clean and classic depending on the materials and finishes.

     

    How would you define today’s “new traditional” design?

    I think of new traditional design as being classic, timeless, and sophisticated with an eclectic aesthetic, modern details, and contemporary fabrics and finishes.

     

    How would you describe your personal design style?

    My personal design style is tailored, artful, and classic with lots of natural elements and global influences. I love curating bespoke and eclectic pieces to create a unique and inviting environment. I think it’s important to consider sustainability and wellness in design, so I love to incorporate unique vintage and antique finds and source from responsible and fair-trade manufacturers.

  • Lindsey Coral Harper

    Which “traditional” design rule(s) do you swear by?

    Get the scale and the furniture layout right, then you can pretty much do whatever you want color-wise! Your curtains should ALWAYS touch the floor, I cannot stand to see curtain floating an inch or so off the ground, like they are just waiting for a mop to come by!

     

    Which design rule(s) do you break?

    Ha ha ha! I probably break most of them! I mix and match a lot, and that includes periods of furniture.

     

    Do you have favorite “traditional” design elements (A classic furniture design, pattern, style, etc.)?

    I love traditional hand-blocked prints on linen and chintz. I love an old-school ticking. I still line all of my curtains in ticking stripes, which I learned from Richard Keith Langham.

     

    Which iconic interior designer(s) do you admire, and feel are still relevant today? Furniture and/or product designer(s)?

    I really love anything Billy Baldwin designed and appreciated that he wasn’t afraid of stockpiling a pair of etageres! His work was beautiful and comfortable without feeling too grand.

     

    What design eras inspire you?

    There are almost too many to choose from. I do like Sister Parish/Albert Hadley era. They knew how to make a house into a really comfortable home using color and texture in clever ways. I also admire Elsie de Wolfe. She could turn a room into something over the top with color and overscale furniture and fixtures. I love anything whimsical!

     

    Which antiques or vintage designs do you think have held up over time and play well with today’s updated traditional interiors?

    I like to blend in vintage bamboo and rattan when I can. I love soulful brass accessories. I like a room to look a bit lived in versus a brand-new hotel; I think your house should look like you live in it.

     

    Tell us how your work is inspired by travel and other cultures.

    Seeing how other countries mix and match patterns and even set a table for entertaining influences me. From the formality of London to the colors of Morocco and the simplicity of the Bahamas. All of these experiences from traveling are additive; every trip inspires me and influences what I propose to clients.

     

    How do you keep your traditional interiors fresh and current?

    I start with the basics: really good furniture lines, a great color palette, and, hopefully, contemporary art. Often, my clients have a great art collection, so it’s great to weave that into what I deliver for them. I also typically mix in newer geometric prints with classic florals, which I think can be unexpected and fresh.

     

    Give us a couple of examples of modern and traditional design elements that work well together. (For example, chinoiserie paired with a Parsons table or Converse worn with Prada suit.)

    I like the idea of mixing old and new: furniture, often; art, sometimes; design, always. For instance, I will put a traditional dining room table and chairs into a room with freshly lacquered walls and modern art. Or I will put a modern chandelier into a foyer with a traditional Gracie wallpaper.

     

    What is a classic color combination that still feels fresh?

    Red/white/blue, maybe because it’s summer. I love chartreuse and navy—is that classic?!?

     

    Do you have a favorite go-to palette at the moment?

    That is so tough. I’ve been working with a lot of salmon and tan, and I love that it’s soft and livable. I also just installed a lavender and Prussian blue study for a great client down South; the colors are pretty wonderful together! It’s pretty glam with a traditional printed curtain, very unexpected and cool.

     

    How would you define today’s “new traditional” design?

    I think the new traditional is just that, there is a new way to make things look fresh and traditional without looking like your grandparents’ home! I think there are great decorators/designers out there who know just how to blend old with new, modern with antiques, classic with contemporary. Decorating is all about the balance!

     

    How would you describe your personal design style?

    I like to think of myself as a somewhat traditional, albeit colorful, layered, and sophisticated. I love saturating a room with an unusual and lush color palette, adding in some extraordinary accessories to complement both furniture and the whole experience.

  • Melanie Acevado

    Andrew Brown

    Which “traditional” design rule(s) do you swear by?  

    I’ve never been a rule follower. For every rule that works in one situation, there will always be another situation in which it doesn’t make sense. However, some that always seem to work more often than not for me are symmetry, mixing textures, and odd-numbered groupings.

     

    Which design rule(s) do you break?

    I’ve never been afraid to paint an antique. If a gilt mirror would look better painted white, then paint it; if a chandelier would take on a new life with a few coats of gesso, then do it. I recently had a pair of antique brown chairs ebonized, and they suddenly felt so modern with contrasting green upholstery.

     

    Do you have favorite “traditional” design elements (A classic furniture design, pattern, style, etc.?)

    I love “brown” furniture, English hall chairs, plaster busts, ikats, animal prints, Venetian mirrors, faux finishes, Palladian architecture.

     

    Which iconic interior designer(s) do you admire, and feel are still relevant today? Furniture and/or product designer(s)?

    So many! Dorothy Draper, Madeleine Castaing, Elsie de Wolfe, Albert Hadley, Billy Baldwin, Michael Taylor.

     

    What design eras inspire you?

    The 1920s and the 1930s Art Deco period. 1970s Halston era.

     

    Which antiques or vintage designs do you think have held up over time and play well with today’s updated traditional interiors?

    Swedish Gustavian-style furniture, French Louis chairs, John Dickenson’s white plaster African-inspired furniture, campaign furniture, Jean-Michel Frank’s designs, Diego Giacometti’s designs.

     

    Tell us how your work is inspired by travel and other cultures.

    I grew up overseas, living in France and West Africa, which had a major impact on the lens through which I see and approach design. It is the reason I am drawn to a very diverse, eclectic mix in my interiors. Travel is a huge source of inspiration for me, as well as a major source for pieces that end up in my projects. I shop the Paris flea markets at least twice a year and ship items back, both for current projects and also to keep on hand for future projects. I also shop for art and antiques and one-of-a-kind pieces on all of my travels. In Tokyo, there is a favorite antique textile shop that I buy from every time I visit the city. They have everything from antique kimonos to fragments of antique textiles that I use as everything from art to hang on the wall to pillows and throws. In Cape Town this summer, I visited numerous art galleries sourcing art for several projects as well as visiting local design shops for unique accessories and antiques. This fall I will be going on a buying trip with clients to France and the UK to purchase items for a very special project with the architect Ernesto Buch in the Dominican Republic. So, travel and exposure to diverse cultures are really essential components to all of my projects.

     

    How do you keep your traditional interiors fresh and current?

    I think a large part of it is constantly exposing myself to new things and always sourcing. When I travel abroad I am always visiting local markets and shops to source for fabrics, art, and antiques, and when I travel in the U.S. to Atlanta, New York, Chicago, or Los Angeles. I always spend a day or two visiting the design centers as well as the antique and design shops. Reading is also a source for new ideas. I search out bookstores specializing in old or out-of-print design, art, and fashion books, as I find that looking to the past is a great source for inspiration.

     

    Give us a couple of examples of modern and traditional design elements that work well together. (For example, chinoiserie paired with a Parsons table or Converse worn with Prada suit.)

    Klismos chairs are a type of chair used in ancient Greece that have a curved back and tapered, curved legs that, thanks to the likes of TH Robsjohn-Gibbings and Michael Taylor, have found widespread acceptance in the present day. They work incredibly well in both modern and traditional settings. One of my favorite usages is as dining chairs and to pair them with a modern, white laminate Saarinen dining table. I also love an antique Coromandel screen paired with streamlined furniture. Another modern element is overscale framed photography mixed with antiques, a favorite being the photographer David Hillegas’ photographs from India, which commingle incredibly well with antique and traditional furnishings.

     

    What is a classic color combination that still feels fresh?

    Blue and white is obviously the first thought that comes to mind. I also love black and white and green and blue.

     

    Do you have a favorite go-to palette at the moment?

    I seem to be doing a log of green palettes lately, as a number of clients love green.

     

    How would you define today’s “new traditional” design?

    I think today’s “new traditional” design is highly personal and client-focused. It’s about design that makes sense for and is reflective of your clients and their homes, not just about achieving a “look” that might work in a photograph. That really has nothing to do with how your clients live in their home. It’s about function and well as form, about both comfort and beauty, of using your knowledge and expertise to create a home that looks like your client and not just a cookie-cutter formula that is used over and over again.

     

    How would you describe your personal design style?

    My personal design style is highly eclectic, art-filled, comfortable, layered, and colorful.

  • Jessica Antola

    Starrett Hoyt Ringbom

    Which “traditional” design rule(s) do you swear by?

    I always approach a room with a traditional, symmetrical floor plan. When the basis for the room is clear and classic, you can kind of go nuts from there. I also always like to follow the Albert Hadley rule of one black thing.

     

    Which design rule(s) do you break?

    To me, fabric, pattern and color combinations are very intuitive; there are no rules as far as I am concerned with mixing things up. I go with what I think is fabulous, grabs me, and makes my heart sing.

     

    Do you have favorite “traditional” design elements (A classic furniture design, pattern, style, etc.?)

    I love the traditional French decorating approach of using one print for an entire room. It always looks so chic.

     

    Which iconic interior designer(s) do you admire, and feel are still relevant today? Furniture and/or product designer(s)?

    I am always awe-inspired by Josef Frank. His textile designs are so modern and different and singular; there is nothing like them. His furniture designs are equally fabulous and timeless. And then the list goes on – David Hicks and Henri Samuel for color theory, Albert Hadley and Billy Baldwin for chic American style.

     

    What design eras inspire you?

    I am inspired by the ’20s, ’30s, and ’40s – the boldness and optimism that people sought through design and decor. People felt they could change the world, the way people lived! How incredible that the brightest and best were working toward such ideals.

     

    Which antiques or vintage designs do you think have held up over time and play well with today’s updated traditional interiors?

    I personally love French and English antiques, including the much maligned “brown” furniture.  I feel if it is a great piece, it will look fabulous in the mix – good design is good design.

     

    Tell us how your work is inspired by travel and other cultures.

    As Diana Vreeland famously said, “The eye has to travel!” Travel is everything! From the unexpected colors to textiles to tile work and pattern play, there is always something you see and take home with you for your toolbox.

     

    How do you keep your traditional interiors fresh and current?

    I like to mix in modern furniture or lighting, unexpected colors, and modern art. I also think what makes a home feel current is keeping it unfussy. You can have a very chic and tightly designed space that still feels casual. I like that.

     

    Give us a couple of examples of modern and traditional design elements that work well together. (For example, chinoiserie paired with a Parsons table or Converse worn with Prada suit.)

    My go-to wardrobe staple is jeans and Chanel—I have always been a high-low girl! In design I love mixing elements in one event like a traditional dining table surround by Cesca chairs or a Maison Jansen table with a Fornasetti lamp. When the dialogue between the elements is harmonious but unexpected, it looks great.

     

    What is a classic color combination that still feels fresh?

    Black and white and emerald green.

     

    Do you have a favorite go-to palette at the moment?

    For urban interiors, I lean toward jewel tones, and right now I must admit I am into purples and lavenders (GASP!).

     

    How would you define today’s “new traditional” design?

    I think the “new traditional” is all about cultured, daring interiors. Design that speaks about who lives there, their interests, and personal style yet stays grounded in a traditional approach to what a home should be.

     

    How would you describe your personal design style?

    My personal style is eccentric, colorful and glamorous but also inviting, unfussy, and approachable.

  • Laura Negri

    Mallory Mathison Glenn

    Which “traditional” design rule(s) do you swear by?

    There are standard dimensions that I learned in design school that I refer to—a 18”-20” cocktail table to sofa or having an end table only a few inches taller than the sofa arm—that relate back to human scale and comfort. Lighting is an area of design that I cite “rules” … those layers of light; overhead, lamp, sconce, and natural are an important rule of thumb to follow.

     

    Which design rule(s) do you break?

    Most any rule can be broken if done intentionally. We love to put pattern on pattern and use dozens of fabrics in the same space OR drench a room in one solid pattern.

     

    Do you have favorite “traditional” design elements (A classic furniture design, pattern, style, etc.)? 

    I love traditional fabrics: English polished chintz, hand-blocked linens, and linen velvets. Collections of porcelain such as a rose medallion or blue and white are always beautiful in a display cabinet or hanging on a wall.

     

    Which iconic interior designer(s) do you admire, and feel are still relevant today? Furniture and/or product designer(s)?

    Ahhh there are so many! Mark Hampton, Sister Parish, Nancy Lancaster, Billy Baldwin, Mario Buatta, and George Stacey to name a few. I reference these designers' work often for inspiration and feel that any space could be as fresh today as it was years ago.

     

    What design eras inspire you?

    Ha – honestly I love the 1980s Mario Buatta and Mark Hampton era with oil paintings of dogs hung from ribbons and gathered balloon valances! Also, English Country homes of the ’ 20s and ’ 30s are very inspiring for a collected, lived-in, comfortable feeling with a storied perception.

     

    Which antiques or vintage designs do you think have held up over time and play well with today’s updated traditional interiors?

    Anything Neoclassical or Regency works beautifully with today’s more streamlined upholstery or clean-lined pieces. I’m also a huge fan of chinoiserie, so bring on the Chinese Chippendale in droves!

     

    Tell us how your work is inspired by travel and other cultures.

    Traveling is extremely significant for inspiration. While there are many important buildings and interiors in the United States, we are adolescent in global culture and architectural history. Visiting a 1,000-year-old cathedral in France or a 500-year-old English manor home educates and influences in an incomparable way. My library of design books is also essential in both studying and sparking ideas.

     

    How do you keep your traditional interiors fresh and current?

    We create designes based on our client’s lifestyle, interests, and needs and focus on bringing pieces they will love together. There isn’t a deliberate effort to keep our projects current, but innately they feel that way because of the individuality and personality perceived through the colors, fabrics, and pieces.

     

    Give us a couple of examples of modern and traditional design elements that work well together. (For example, Chinoiserie paired with a Parsons table or Converse worn with Prada suit.)

    Of course, contemporary art works in any interior – I would love to see a Rothko or Kandinsky hanging in Buckingham Palace (and who knows, maybe there is one!) A fantastic abstract painting, even by an unknown artist, looks incredible over a tufted, bullion skirted, camelback sofa!

     

    What is a classic color combination that still feels fresh?

    I love all versions of apricot, salmon and coral … I think that a soft, pinky coral looks incredible with deep vermillion!

     

    Do you have a favorite go-to palette at the moment?

    Both personally and in design projects for clients, celadon and coral are always a favorite color combination.

     

    How would you define today’s “new traditional” design?

    I think “new traditional” is about living with what you love… regardless of the period or style attached to the piece. It’s about embracing and accepting items that speak to you and creating a collection of those items to make a home exceptionally personal and a true reflection of those who reside within.

     

    How would you describe your personal design style?

    In a nutshell “live what you love” describes my personal style completely. Choose things you love and then go with it – don’t stress and enjoy your home. My personal home is very collected, colorful and honestly, can be a little chaotic (with 5-year-old twin boys!). Original art, sentimental objects, and loads of books along with comfortable furniture that dogs and children can use freely abound. But I take a “do as I say not as I do” approach with my clients who have a similar family dynamic… for example I have silk velvet cushions on my sofa and delicate porcelain collections on the cocktail table … which I would be hesitant to do for a client with young children!

    “Decorating and design should have one prevailing intent; to create beautiful, delightful spaces that are loved and live in entirely.”  This is a quote I wrote for an article earlier this year and it really does speak to the way I approach a client project and my own home. I want my clients to LOVE where they live and have their spaces incite happiness.